Department Outcomes

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  1. Fall 2015 requirements:
  2. approve outcomes
  3. come up with three main objectives that this list of 14 maps to.
  4. come up with assessment plan for this year

Contents

[outcomes to course matrix]

[2015 assessment progress]

Taiwo's recommended outcomes

  1. Algorithms and Complexity (AL) Ability to select algorithms appropriate to particular purposes and to apply them, recognizing the possibility that no suitable algorithm may exist.
  2. Algorithms and Complexity (AL):Ability to understand the key issues in a problem domain and to design a solution to solve specific problem.
  3. Architecture and Organization (AR): Ability to understand the hardware environment upon which all computing is based, and the interface it provides to higher software layers.
  4. Discrete Structures (DS) Ability to understand and work with concepts from discrete structures.
  5. Information Assurance and Security (IAS): Ability to protect our information systems and attest to the assurance of the past and current state of processes and data.
  6. Information Management (IM): A thorough understanding of how to capture, digitize, represent, organize, transform, and present information and
  7. Information Management (IM): The ability to select and implement algorithms for efficient and effective access of stored data.
  8. Parallel and Distributed Computing (PD): A thorough understanding of fundamental systems concepts such as concurrency and parallel execution, consistency in state/memory manipulation, and latency
  9. Parallel and Distributed Computing (PD): Ability to develop parallel applications.
  10. Software Development Fundamentals (SDF): Ability to develop solutions in programming languages, where the solution is created in the context of a process that includes analysis, specification, design, implementation, and testing.
  11. Software Development Fundamentals (SDF): The ability to incorporate data structures, encapsulation, and information hiding in the solution.
  12. Software Engineering (SE): Ability to apply skills and knowledge to effectively build reliable software systems that satisfy the requirements of customers and users considering aspects such as quality, schedule, cost, configuration management, and professionalism.
  13. System Fundamentals & Operating Systems (SF) A thorough understanding of the set of abstractions (e.g., concurrent programming, virtual addressing, memory protection, caching, and transactions) that is useful in many large-scale software systems and
  14. System Fundamentals & Operating Systems (SF): Ability to apply this understanding in the design of algorithms.

Three overarching objectives

  1. Technical Competency. Graduates will apply their technical knowledge and skill to develop software. (1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)
  2. Software engineering. Graduates will have the necessary skills to successfully work on a software development team over a project's life cycle. (10, 11, 12)
  3. Hardware. Graduates will understand the set of abstractions (concurrent programming, virtual addressing, memory protection, caching, transactions, …) that are useful in many large-scale software systems not just OS kernels. Graduates will have basic core competencies in kernel development. (3, 13, 14)


Our proposed outcomes

  1. Algorithms and Complexity (AL) Ability to select algorithms appropriate to particular purposes and to apply them, recognizing the possibility that no suitable algorithm may exist. Ability to understand the key issues in a problem domain and to design a solution to solve specific problem.
  2. Architecture and Organization (AR) Ability to understand the hardware environment upon which all computing is based, and the interface it provides to higher software layers.
  3. Discrete Structures (DS) Ability to understand and work with concepts from discrete structures.
  4. Information Assurance and Security (IAS) Ability to protect our information systems and attest to the assurance of the past and current state of processes and data.
  5. Information Management (IM) A thorough understanding of how to capture, digitize, represent, organize, transform, and present information and the ability to select and implement algorithms for efficient and effective access of stored data.
  6. Parallel and Distributed Computing (PD) A thorough understanding of fundamental systems concepts such as concurrency and parallel execution, consistency in state/memory manipulation, and latency and the ability to develop parallel applications.
  7. Software Development Fundamentals (SDF) Ability to develop solutions in programming languages, where the solution is created in the context of a process that includes analysis, specification, design, implementation, and testing. The ability to incorporate data structures, encapsulation, and information hiding in the solution.
  8. Software Engineering (SE) Ability to apply skills and knowledge to effectively build reliable software systems that satisfy the requirements of customers and users considering aspects such as quality, schedule, cost, configuration management, and professionalism.
  9. System Fundamentals & Operating Systems (SF) A thorough understanding of the set of abstractions (e.g., concurrent programming, virtual addressing, memory protection, caching, and

transactions) that is useful in many large-scale software systems and the ability to apply this understanding in the design of algorithms.

Old outcomes

  1. Abstract Reasoning The ability to construct algorithms. Knowledge of core algorithms of computer science and the ability to use them in designing programs
  2. Application Areas The ability to understand the key issues in a problem domain, and to design a solution to solve the specific problem.
  3. Software Development Solid programming skills and the use of best practices including software design principles and software development processess
  4. Information Technology Understanding how technology operates in a business environment. Ability to apply I.T. to this environment.
  5. Languages Understanding of the different programming paradigms and the languages that exist to support them. Competence in multiple languages.
  6. Understanding of Computer Systems Working knowledge of computer architecture and operating systems.
  7. Non-technical skills Ability to work in a software development team. Ability to communicate effectively.
  8. Ethics Understanding of the social and ethical impacts of the discipline.


Assessments

  • 2010-11 assessment: abstract reasoning and software development assessment of 110 students
  • 2011-12 assessment: abstract reasoning and software development assessment of 110 students +  ??
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